Tag Archives: lamiaceae

Mentha piperita

Mint: Discovering the Huge Array of Uses

Mint
Mint (Photo credit: James Jardine)

Mint is part of the Genus Mentha in the Lamiaceae family, and there are a huge number of different species available for you to use. The different species are not incredibly distinct; however, it is believed that there are over 15 different varieties. All mints are considered to be pleasant to smell; however, they can also be used for medicines and for dietary requirements.

The leaves are extremely distinct on the Mentha plant and are arranged in pairs along the steam. The color of the plants varies from grey-green to dark green, and in some countries they can even be yellow. The mint plant also contains fruit, which houses one to four seeds, which can help to propagate the plant.

This perennial herb enjoys wet growing conditions, and thrives in moist soils, however, they can be found in several different countries. Mint is incredibly fast growing, and will spread over a huge distance if allowed to grow. Therefore, many people consider this plant to be invasive, if left to grow unattended.

Due to the incredible speedy growth of these plants, one plant will provide the average household with enough mint for all year. To control the growth, you may find it easier to place the mint in a pot or container, which will ensure that you are not over run with this plant. Having this plant in your garden is perfect to repel many insects and pests.

Mint leaves.
Mint leaves. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You can harvest mint at any time, and fresh mint leaves are perfect in many different dishes and beverages. Once picked you will need to use the leaves immediately, or store them in a refrigerator in a plastic bag. You may also want to consider freezing the mint leaves in ice cube trays and removing when needed.

Dried mint leaves are another fantastic way of taking advantage of this delicious herb, and these will need to be stored in an airtight container. There are many incredible health benefits from using the Mentha leaves in your cooking. You will find that this plant aids your digestion and stimulates your saliva glands.

Once these have been stimulated, your body will produce the enzymes, which help your body to digest your food. These plants will also help to relieve respiratory problems and coughs, and can help if you suffer with asthma. However, you need to be aware that too much mentha, can cause more problems, and panic attacks.

You will also find that this plant is excellent at helping with headaches and when you suffer from nausea. Some people use the plant for antiseptic purposes, and mint can help with acne and skin conditions. The plant can also be used to purify damaged skin and soothes burns and cuts, which you may have.

Bad breath can also be combated with mint, and will result in your mouth being cleaner and far fresher. The high levels of vitamin C, which is in the mint, will play a huge part in boosting the immune system and help fight viruses. There are also high levels of manganese present, which is an antioxidant, which targets the free radicals within your body.
High levels of amino acid are also present, which is excellent at helping to control mood swings, and will affect how you feel. This is often why people feel better after a cup of mint tea, and why it has an incredible calming effect. If you do not want to drink the tea, you can easily inhale the mint, which will have the same effect.

There are several different dishes that you can place the mint within to create delicious meals for everyone to enjoy. The leaves can be used in both sweet and savory dishes, as it has a pleasant cool after taste. You may want to include the mint in ice creams, jellies, candies, and teas; however, it is also delicious with meat, especially lamb.

This image shows a Mint plant of the species M...
This image shows a Mint plant of the species Mentha gattefossei. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Some alcoholic drinks also have this plant included, and these make perfect ingredients for cocktails. Whether you want to eat, drink or use the mint in a natural remedy, it has a huge amount of uses for everyone. You will feel healthier, and have a better digestion after consuming the menthe plant, and be better informed about all of the incredible benefits.

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Sage - Salvia Officinalis

A Sage In The Garden: Salvia officinalis

Name

 

Common sage
Common sage (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The genus name, Salvia, comes from the Latin verb “salvare” (to save but also to cure).

Salvia officinalis (garden sage, common sage) ...
Salvia officinalis (garden sage, common sage) – Lamiaceae; Flower Français : sauge officinale Latina: Salvia officinalis – Lamiaceae (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The specific name, officinalis, refers to this plant’s medicinal use.

Also Known as

  • sage
  • common sage
  • garden sage
  • golden sage
  • kitchen sage
  • true sage
  • culinary sage
  • dalmatian sage
  • broadleaf sage

 

Medicine Uses

Parts Used

leaves

Actions

antimicrobial, astringent, antiseptic, decongestant, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant, tonic, digestive, antioxidant, rejuvenative, diuretic, phytoestrogenic, antihydrotic, carminative, cholagogue, vasodilator

Systems

Digestion

  • enhances appetite and digestive function
  • facilitates assimilation of fats
  • calms tension and colic
  • alleviates bloating and wind
  • decreases blood sugar levels
  • reduces excessive salivation, as in Parkinson’s disease

Mental and emotional

  • decreases anxiety
  • raises mood

Respiratory system

  • good for catarrh, common colds and upper body infections

Immune system

  • beneficial in the treatment of cold, flu, fevers, sore throats and chest infections
  • effective against candida, herpes simplex type 2 and influenza virus II
  • great for arthritis and gout

Urinary system

  • removes toxins via the kidneys

Reproductive system

  • decreases excessive lactation
  • ideal for menopausal problems such as night sweats and insomnia
  • balances hormones and it is antispasmodic for irregular and painful periods

Externally

  • apply as antiseptic lotion for cuts, burns, insect bites, skin problems, ulcers and sunburn
  • gargle for sore throats
  • mouthwash for inflamed gums and mouth ulcers
  • apply leaves to reduces toothache
  • use poultice for sprains, swellings and ulcers

Caution

  • may be toxic in large dosage or over a prolonged period
  • avoid in pregnancy and breast-feeding
  • avoid with epilepsy

 

Lavender-flower

The Healing Properties and Preparation of Lavender

Lavender  (Lavandula spp.) is a flowering plant genus found in the Mint family (Lamiaceae). There are 39 species of lavender. It is native to southern Europe, North Africa, and the south-western regions of the Asian continent.

The lavender plant is cultivated for a number of reasons. The plant is commonplace in gardens because of its durability and beautiful appearance. Moreover, lavender has a beautiful and distinct scent. Most importantly however, the plant is versatile and has a number of different uses, ranging from culinary to medicinal.

Appearance

When looking for lavender, there are a few characteristics which are easily identifiable. Firstly, lavender grows as a small shrub.

It has leaves which are a medium grey color and appear to be quite linear. They also appear to be covered with ‘puff’.

The easiest characteristic to identify in lavender is the violet and sometimes blue flowers associated with the plant. They are found growing compactly in spikes.

A lavender plant can be anywhere from 30cm to 70cm tall.

If you are interested in harvesting lavender, the best time to do this is in the morning because that is the period when the flowers have an abundance of active substances.

 

Benefits

Lavender has a number of benefits for the human body, both internal and external. Lavender flowers have antiseptic, calming, and cicatrizing properties. These characteristics emerge because of mineral substances, tannin, and essential oils. In terms of internal relief, lavender has been known to cure digestive problems, headaches, asthma, dizziness, and heart problems. Finally, it is used as a relief for depression.

For headaches or anxiety, lavender tea and infusions are the best method for relieving your ailment. For colds or fever, lavender vinegar is effective. If you are afflicted with acne or have weak, damaged hair, lavender oil is useful. In addition, the oil can be used to cure insomnia, clear nostrils, and disinfect wounds.

Preparation

Here are some preparation methods for various mixtures containing lavender:

  • Lavender vinegar: Can be used for colds or simply as an insecticide. To make lavender vinegar, combine lavender flowers with juniper petals, sage leaves, mint, rose, and savory in one liter of vinegar. Allow the mixture to macerate for seven days. After this, filter out the plants and top the remaining mixture off with some vinegar until it once again levels at one liter.
  • Lavender tincture: Can be used for throat afflictions or as a mouthwash. Combine 200g of lavender flowers with one liter of alcohol. Add 500ml of distilled water to the compound. Leave this mixture to soak for four days, occasionally stirring. Finally, filter out the lavender and use as necessary.
  • Lavender tea: Used for stress and headaches. Also has applications for light wounds and minor burns. Combine two teaspoons of lavender flowers with one cup of hot water. It must be drunk while it is hot. If you would like to sweeten your tea, honey is recommended. Additionally, if the tea is being used for cuts or burns, utilize five or six teaspoons of lavender flowers for a stronger mixture.
  • Lavender oil: Arguably the most useful of all lavender mixtures. Combine 20g of lavender flowers which have been dried with approximately 20ml of alcohol. Put this mixture in a medium sized jar and add 200ml of olive oil. Stir the ingredients well. Place the mixture in a steam bath and let it boil for two hours. Stir every fifteen minutes. Once you have completed the steam bath, cover the mixture for two days, after which you can filter it through gauze. Finally, the mixture must be left in a cool, dark place. If you are using lavender oil for skin afflictions, it is recommended that it is applied once a weak, preferably in the evening, to freshly cleaned skin. After being left on the skin for 20 minutes, it should be washed off with warm water.

These are just a few of the mixtures which can be made from the lavender plant.

Apart from the medicinal uses of lavender, the plant can also be used in cooking and baking, as well as in various cosmetic applications. However, if you keep in mind the few mixtures provided as well as the method in which you can identify the lavender plant, you will always be capable of utilizing the healing benefits of lavender to help you in your everyday life.

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